Anatomy and physiology muscular system

Skeletal Muscle Fibers

anatomy and physiology muscular system

The Muscular System Explained In 6 Minutes

and

The muscular system is the biological system of humans that produces movement. The muscular system, in vertebrates, is controlled through the nervous system, although some muscles, like cardiac muscle, can be completely autonomous. Muscle is contractile tissue and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Its function is to produce force and cause motion, either locomotion or movement within internal organs. Much of muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival, like the contraction of the heart or peristalsis, which pushes food through the digestive system.

Human muscle system , the muscles of the human body that work the skeletal system , that are under voluntary control, and that are concerned with movement, posture, and balance. Broadly considered, human muscle—like the muscles of all vertebrates—is often divided into striated muscle or skeletal muscle , smooth muscle , and cardiac muscle. Smooth muscle is under involuntary control and is found in the walls of blood vessels and of structures such as the urinary bladder , the intestines , and the stomach. Cardiac muscle makes up the mass of the heart and is responsible for the rhythmic contractions of that vital pumping organ; it too is under involuntary control. With very few exceptions, the arrangement of smooth muscle and cardiac muscle in humans is identical to the arrangement found in other vertebrate animals. This article is concerned with the skeletal muscles of the human body, with emphasis on muscle movements and the changes that have occurred in human skeletal musculature as a result of the long evolutionary process that involved the assumption of upright posture. Smooth muscle and cardiac muscle and the physiology of muscle contraction are treated at great length in the article muscle.



Muscular system anatomy and physiology

Osmosis: Muscular system anatomy and physiology. Get started by creating your free Osmosis account and activating your two week free trial.

Human muscle system

To move the skeleton, the tension created by the contraction of the fibers in most skeletal muscles is transferred to the tendons. The tendons are strong bands of dense, regular connective tissue that connect muscles to bones. The bone connection is why this muscle tissue is called skeletal muscle. To pull on a bone, that is, to change the angle at its synovial joint, which essentially moves the skeleton, a skeletal muscle must also be attached to a fixed part of the skeleton. Prime Movers and Synergists. The biceps brachii flex the lower arm. The brachoradialis, in the forearm, and brachialis, located deep to the biceps in the upper arm, are both synergists that aid in this motion.

Figure 1. A Body in Motion. The muscular system allows us to move, flex and contort our bodies. Practicing yoga, as pictured here, is a good example of the voluntary use of the muscular system. Think about the things that you do each day—talking, walking, sitting, standing, and running—all of these activities require movement of particular skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscles are even used during sleep.

The muscular system is responsible for the movement of the human body. Each of these muscles is a discrete organ constructed of skeletal muscle tissue, blood vessels, tendons, and nerves. Muscle tissue is also found inside of the heart, digestive organs, and blood vessels. In these organs, muscles serve to move substances throughout the body. Visceral muscle is found inside of organs like the stomach , intestines, and blood vessels.

The muscular system allows us to move, flex and contort our bodies. Practicing yoga, as pictured here, is a good example of the voluntary use of the muscular.
song please don t go

The rippling muscles of professional boxers or weight lifters are often the first thing that comes to mind when one hears the word muscle. But muscle is also the dominant tissue in the heart and in the walls of other hollow organs of the body. Producing movement is a common function of all muscle types, but skeletal muscle plays three other important roles in the body as well. This section is a bit of a hodge-podge. Every one of our odd skeletal muscles is attached to bone, or to other connective tissue structures, at no fewer than two points. Muscles are arranged in such a way that whatever one muscle can do, other muscles can reverse.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Bobby S. says:







  2. Agathe F. says:

    human muscle system | Functions, Diagram, & Facts | iammrfoster.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *