The enduring legacy oil culture and society in venezuela

Miguel Tinker Salas: The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture, and Society in Venezuela

the enduring legacy oil culture and society in venezuela

The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture, and Society in Venezuela and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. As Miguel Tinker Salas demonstrates, oil has also transformed the country’s social, cultural, and political landscapes. In The Enduring Legacy, Tinker Salas.

and   and   the

North American and British petroleum companies, seeking to maintain their stakes in Venezuela, promoted the idea that their interests were synonymous with national development. They set up oil camps—residential communities to house their workers—that brought Venezuelan employees together with workers from the United States and Britain, and eventually with Chinese, West Indian, and Mexican migrants as well. Through the camps, the companies offered not just housing but also schooling, leisure activities, and acculturation into a structured, corporate way of life. Tinker Salas contends that these practices shaped the heart and soul of generations of Venezuelans whom the industry provided with access to a middle-class lifestyle. His interest in how oil suffused the consciousness of Venezuela is personal: Tinker Salas was born and raised in one of its oil camps.

Jonathan Eastwood, Miguel Tinker Salas. Durham, N. The book has much to offer. After a brief introduction on the limitations of the existing historiography, Tinker Salas turns to a well-constructed and informative overview of the human and natural environment of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Venezuela, focusing mostly on the Lake Maracaibo region. This is followed by chapters dealing with the history of early oil exploration, the patterns of human migration that the emerging industry engendered, the ways in which this migration and the coming together of Most users should sign in with their email address.

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Aug 9, Synnopsis : Oil has played a major role in Venezuela s economy since the first gusher was discovered along Lake Maracaibo in



The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture, and Society in Venezuela

Eventually Venezuelan employees of the industry found that their benefits, including relatively high salaries, fueled loyalty to the oil companies. That loyalty sometimes trumped allegiance to the nation-state. North American and British petroleum companies, seeking to maintain their stakes in Venezuela, promoted the idea that their interests were synonymous with national development.

The arrival of Hugo Chavez to the presidency of Venezuela generated a good deal of interest in the United States, not least because this oil-producing nation is one of its largest oil suppliers. When Chavez was first elected to office in he sought to redefine the relationship between and among the nation's state-owned petroleum monopoly, Petroleos de Venezuela PDVSA , the Venezuelan government, and Venezuelan society. But more importantly from the US standpoint, he also sought to curb the powerful influence of the United States in his country. He also challenged the powerful roles of both management and unions. The conflicts Chavez generated through the implementation of these and other reforms led to an ultimately unsuccessful coup attempt against his government in

Miguel Tinker Salas opens his latest work with the question that many asked in about Venezuela: how to explain that a government describing itself as revolutionary ends up facing a crippling strike that almost led to its being overthrown by the nationalized oil industry? Tinker Salas has written a monograph that bridges business and social and cultural history, but he has also written a study in class formation, the Venezuelan middle class, to be specific. The result is not only quite successful but also thoroughly enjoyable. After a couple of chapters describing what the Maracaibo region looked like at the turn of the twentieth century and the early days of exploring for oil through the s, the book follows a thematic approach. Although the author covers nearly a century of oil history, Tinker Salas does not follow a chronological line to organize his text because he argues, convincingly, that continuity rather change characterizes relations between the oil industry and the state throughout the twentieth century.

.

.

.

.

.

0 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *