Who said you can fool some of the time

“You Can Fool All the People”: Did Lincoln Say It?

who said you can fool some of the time

Dec 11, You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the One can fool some men, or fool all men in some places and times.

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This is the talk page for discussing improvements to the Abraham Lincoln page. I will say here, while upon this subject, that I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution in the States where it exists. I believe I have no right to do so. I have no inclination to do so. I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and black races. There is a physical difference between the two which, in my judgment, will probably forever forbid their living together on the footing of perfect equality; and inasmuch as it becomes a necessity that there must be a difference, I, as well as Judge Douglas, am in favor of the race to which I belong having the superior position.

Question Asked by lanfranco. Your Email Address:. Index Newest Popular Best. Join FunTrivia for Free : Hourly trivia games, quizzes, community, and more! Newest Questions Post a Question Search All Questions Please cite all facts with citation links or references from authoritative sources.

Despite it being cited variously as from an speech, or a September speech in Clinton, Illinois, there are no known contemporary records or accounts substantiating that he ever made the statement. The saying was repeated several times in newspaper editorials later in In and, especially, , the saying became commonplace, used in speeches, advertisements, and on portraits of Lincoln. In and later, there were attempts to find contemporaries of Lincoln who could recall Lincoln saying this. Historians have not, generally, found these accounts convincing.

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time. This is probably the most famous of apparently apocryphal remarks attributed to Lincoln. Despite being cited variously as from an speech, or a September speech in Clinton, Illinois, there are no known contemporary records or accounts substantiating that he ever made the statement. The earliest known appearance is October 29, in the Milwaukee Daily Journal. The saying was repeated several times in newspaper editorials later in



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