Words that rhyme with cock

Cock a Doodle Doo

words that rhyme with cock

Words and phrases that rhyme with cock: ( results). 1 syllable: baack, bach, balk, blach, bloc, bloch, block, blok, bn toc, boch, bock, bohlke, bok, broc, broch.

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Can you help us identify the the place of origin or history of this lesser known children's nursery rhyme? Contact us at webmaster rhymes. What's the difference between a Fiddle and a Violin? This nursery rhyme makes several references to the fiddle or fiddling stick. Primitive forms of fiddles were used. Every schoolchild has heard of the story when 'Nero fiddled while Rome burned'. But what is the difference between the common fiddle and the refined violin?

See more words from the same year. Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cock-and-bull story. Nglish: Translation of cock-and-bull story for Spanish Speakers. What made you want to look up cock-and-bull story? Please tell us where you read or heard it including the quote, if possible. Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way. Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!

Cock rhymes. Use Rhymer to find rhyming words quickly.
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See words that rhyme with cock-a-hoop Dictionary: Definition of cock-a-hoop. What made you want to look up cock-a-hoop? Please tell us where you read or heard it including the quote, if possible. Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! From the sanguine to the downright choleric.



cock-and-bull story

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cock-a-hoop

It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of The extended version given below was not printed until c. The rhyme has often been reprinted with illustrations, as suitable reading material for small children. Although the song was not recorded until the mid-eighteenth century, [4] there is some evidence that it is much older. The death of a robin by an arrow is depicted in a 15th-century stained glass window at Buckland Rectory, Gloucestershire , [5] and the rhyme is similar to a story, Phyllyp Sparowe , written by John Skelton about All of these theories are based on perceived similarities in the text to legendary or historical events, or on the similarities of names. Peter Opie pointed out that an existing rhyme could have been adapted to fit the circumstances of political events in the eighteenth century.

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